WHAT DOES IT DO?

You are on your way to a meeting; your car could have access to your calendar and already know the best route to take. If the traffic is heavy your car might send a text to the other party notifying them that you will be late. What if your alarm clock wakes up you at 6 a.m. and then notifies your coffee maker to start brewing coffee for you? What if your office equipment knew when it was running low on supplies and automatically re-ordered more?  What if the wearable device you used in the workplace could tell you when and where you were most active and productive and shared that information with other devices that you used while working?

HOW DOES IT WORK?

The Internet of things (IoT) is the network of physical devices, vehicles, home appliances and other items embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and network connectivity which enables these objects to connect and exchange data. Each thing is uniquely identifiable through its embedded computing system but is able to inter-operate within the existing Internet infrastructure. The IoT allows objects to be sensed or controlled remotely across existing network infrastructure, creating opportunities for more direct integration of the physical world into computer-based systems, and resulting in improved efficiency, accuracy and economic benefit in addition to reduced human intervention. Device-to-device communication or machine-to-machine (M2M) communication is the fundamental use case of IoT. By connecting two local or remote devices, organizations can achieve efficiency while avoiding disruption to production. The IoT platform orchestrates the communication between the devices based on pre-defined rules and business logic.

IOT HISTORY

The Internet of Things (IoT) has not been around for very long. However, there have been visions of machines communicating with one another since the early 1800s. Machines have been providing direct communications since the telegraph (the first landline) was developed in the 1830s and 1840s. Described as “wireless telegraphy,” the first radio voice transmission took place on June 3, 1900, providing another necessary component for developing the Internet of Things. The development of computers began in the 1950s. The Internet of Things, as a concept, wasn’t officially named until 1999. One of the first examples of an Internet of Things is from the early 1980s, and was a Coca Cola machine, located at the Carnegie Melon University. Local programmers would connect by Internet to the refrigerated appliance, and check to see if there was a drink available, and if it was cold, before making the trip.

MOBILE DEVICES

Embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and network connectivity which enables these objects to connect and exchange data.

TRANSPORTATION

The IoT can assist information processing across various transportation systems; continuously monitor the location and conditions of cargo and assets via wireless sensors and send alerts.

SMART HOME

Large smart home systems utilize a main hub or controller to provide users with a central control for all of their devices. These devices can include lighting, heating and air conditioning, media and security systems.

SMART MONITORS

By connecting two local or remote devices, organizations can achieve efficiency while avoiding disruption to production.

SMART CITIES

Can help us reduce waste and improve efficiency for things such as energy use; this helping us understand and improve how we work and live.

SMART THERMO

Long term benefits can include the ability to create a more environmentally friendly home by automating some functions such as ensuring lights and electronics are off.

HEALTH & MEDICAL

To enable remote health monitoring and emergency notification systems. Monitoring devices can range from blood pressure, heart rate monitors capable of monitoring specialized implants, such as pacemakers.

SMART VENDING

Local programmers would connect by Internet to the refrigerated appliance, and check to see if there was a drink available, and if it was cold, before making the trip.

SMART H20

Utilize a main hub or controller to provide users with a central control for all of their devices. Including setting a temperature for your shower using Wi-Fi for remote monitoring.

BY: KARA HACKETT